Estate Planning

Blog Back By Popular Demand: My Name Is "On" Mom's Account, So Won't It Avoid Probate?

The title of this article is a common misconception that people have about avoiding probate.  A person will assume that just because he has been designated as his parent's Agent in his parent's Power of Attorney (POA) that he will have access to his parent's bank account after the parent dies.  The person will incorrectly assume that having his name listed on his parent's account will be enough to avoid probate.

Is A Cotrustee Really Necessary?

Let's face it...as we age, we need help. Admittedly, many of us need help despite not having aged!

I recently finished an emergency job requiring a quick amendment to a trust to enable a client's children to sign checks for her because Client had a debilitating stroke. Client signed her trust about 15 years ago when she was 70ish and quite capable of handling things herself. I wish that Client had come in for periodic reviews so that we could have suggested her adding cotrustees with her.

You're In Debt And Don't Have An Estate, So Why Would You Do Estate Planning?

Most people assume the phrase "estate planning" involves having wealth. That assumption couldn’t be any further from the truth. Estate planning simply means that you are preparing for the unexpected and inevitable. Death does not discriminate according to income level, age, or social status. Face the reality, death is certain for everyone.

Roberson Law Acquires Will Inventory

After practicing for over fifty years, Attorney James Brennan has decided to retire and pass the baton to Nancy Roberson.  James has had hundreds of clients over his career and so he needed another experienced attorney to whom he could refer his clients after he retired.  James decided that Nancy was the person who he would trust with the large original Will inventory that James has accumulated since the 1960s. James formerly practiced at Young & Alexander and Pyper Alexander & Nordstrom, LLC.

The 6 Estate Planning Mistakes That You Don't Want To Make

We are in the business of helping people prepare and plan for the inevitable, so every year we write an article advising our clients about what not to do when it comes to death and disability planning.  The mistakes we have seen people make throughout the past 30 years we have been in practice have caused a lot heartache, stress, and money for our clients to correct.  

My Name Is "On" Mom's Account, So Won't It Avoid Probate?

The title of this article is a common misconception that people have about avoiding probate.  A person will assume that just because he has been designated as his parent's Agent in his parent's Power of Attorney (POA) that he will have access to his parent's bank account after the parent dies.  The person will incorrectly assume that having his name listed on his parent's account will be enough to avoid probate.

Is Your Trust Dated Before 2007?

Ohio Trust Law changed significantly effective January 1, 2007, when the Ohio Trust Code went into effect.  Since that date, on numerous occasions, we have reminded our clients via snail mail, email, or in-person of this important date and suggested that serious consideration be made to update any trust that was dated before the Ohio Trust Code went into effect.

One Attorney’s Case Against Do It Yourself Estate Planning

Everywhere you turn these days, it seems you hear another advertisement for a company that can help you set up a simple will online, from the comfort of your own home.  As an estate planning attorney, it’s pretty common for friends or acquaintances to say to me, “We need to get a will.  Can we do it ourselves or do we need to use an attorney?”  

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